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Margaret Furness
most recent 9 days ago HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 11 days ago by Margaret Furness
Pacifier has suggested Climbing Dame Edith Helen for this rose.
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Reply #1 of 5 posted 10 days ago by Patricia Routley
Not having ‘Dame Edith Helen’ myself, I would say Pacifier is dead right, mainly due to your observation that the canes are “brittle”, and the 1940-65 reference “if roughly handled”… I think the only last question now is to determine if it is the bush or climber. Well done to you all in South Australia for conserving this famous old rose.
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Reply #2 of 5 posted 10 days ago by Margaret Furness
I commented on the branches being pithy to cut, and he said that was also a characteristic of Dame Edith Helen. The description of the bush form says it's well-branched, which the Blakiston plant (from Lexie) isn't. It produces very long canes.
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Reply #3 of 5 posted 9 days ago by Patricia Routley
Perusing the references will help with the decision. Please let us know if and when you would like the files merged - you have valuable bush photos which are lacking in either the bush or climber pages.
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Reply #4 of 5 posted 9 days ago by Margaret Furness
I think it could be merged with the Climber page. I have espaliered it after moving it to a supporting fence: if left to itself it produces long canes with a bloom at the top. The scent is like Musk Lifesavers.
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Reply #5 of 5 posted 9 days ago by Patricia Routley
Merged.
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most recent 9 days ago HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 9 days ago by Margaret Furness
I've been packing up rambler cuttings to post, and this one is the worst to handle. The prickles are often in threes or even fours.
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most recent 10 days ago HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 11 days ago by Margaret Furness
Pacifier has suggested General Jack for this rose.
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Reply #1 of 2 posted 10 days ago by Patricia Routley
I can't help with this one. Perhaps others can?
I recall a 2007 correspondence with Bill Grant wherein he asked:
>Have you grown 'General Jacqueminot' - if so, how did it grow and were you happy with it.

Two plants. One from the Pinjarra Heritage Rose Garden in 2002,
and the other a foundling passed on to me by Rose Marsh, also in 2002. Widely separated. I've never seen a flower from either!
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Reply #2 of 2 posted 10 days ago by Margaret Furness
Pacifier pointed out the rust on the leaves, which I hadn't noticed, but General Jack is susceptible to it. I will check other roses at Blakiston for it.
I haven't grown GJ.
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most recent 12 days ago SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 25 JAN 14 by sam w
I have grown the rose Vintage Gardens sells under this name for about five years and I have never discerned any difference between its bloom and that of RdV. It is at best a slightly more robust selection of RdV.
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Reply #1 of 3 posted 12 days ago by Nastarana
Vintage Gardens Book of Roses, 2006. p. 75, the entry for Pius IX describes finding a reversion to this rose on a bush of Reine des Violets. From that it was concluded that "This is the sport parent of Reine des Violettes".
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Reply #2 of 3 posted 12 days ago by jedmar
There is a difference in colouring to RdV. Please also see "Reine des Violettes - Helle Variante" which is sold in Germany. Possibly also a reversion to Pius IX, which was propagated as RdV.
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Reply #3 of 3 posted 12 days ago by Margaret Furness
There is a bristly rose sold in Australia as Reine des Violettes, and also turning up in old cemeteries. We guessed it was Pope Pius IX. Photos taken late summer, South Australia, zone 9b. Both roses are in the Blakiston Schoolhouse garden.
If only many roses would sport to thornless forms!
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